AHomeowner Shoots, Kills Trespassing Teen

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    • Feb 2013
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    #201 !Report
    DrFunkenstein wrote: #181
    q
    @jmiller94 So in your scenario we see blips on the radar screen coming from the direction of North Korea then we shoot them down immediately and then afterwards when the 2 passenger jets are down in the pacific you say defend the killing of the passenger jets? The simple thing that you miss is th...
    @DrFunkenstein "...you have to kill because it's fun."!??!...You are out of your mind! You are more of an extremist than any of the gun owners who have commented on your post. Murder?...lol try and make that one stick. The homeowner was arrested was he? So way does that mean?..That you're right and all of the law enforcement involved or with authority to arrest this man are wrong for not doing so? Not one of them knows right from wrong and you're the only one who does. Talk about audacity. You need to back up and do a little self analysis.
    • Aug 2012
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    #202 !Report
    Medicinebow wrote: #133
    q
    I agree this is tragic and I know it would bother the hell out of me.
    @Medicinebow Back when I was a young nurse caring for cancer patients I gave one of my patients a dose of morphine intravenously to help him with his pain (he had bone cancer, a particularly horrible disease). When I checked on him a few minutes later he had passed. At that moment I was convinced that my care had killed him. With a lot of support from my treatment team, especially the oncologist, I realized my action wasn't the cause of death but in fact had probably made that death more bearable.

    But I still, 30 years later, have dreams about it. And that makes me very sympathetic to the homeowner in this situation. It also prevents me from understanding the commenters here who seem focused on "blame" and "fault", as if either of those things matter in a tragedy like this.
    • Sep 2012
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    #203 !Report
    DARSB wrote: #202
    q
    @Medicinebow Back when I was a young nurse caring for cancer patients I gave one of my patients a dose of morphine intravenously to help him with his pain (he had bone cancer, a particularly horrible disease). When I checked on him a few minutes later he had passed. At that moment I was convinced...
    @DARSB I have the highest respect for nurses involed in helping oncology patients. It's something I couldn't do for any length of time. No, you didn't kill him but I can relate to how you feel. I'm fairly certain you helped this person.

    I have difficulty believing anyone wants to be in the situation the homeowner faced. As I stated in another post, some kid from down the road tried getting in to our house. Of course I didn't know who it was at the time. The wave of emotion that comes over you in a situation like that is unreal. I went from terror to mad to shaken in a very short time. I got the sheriff and CPS involved. Yeah, I still think of that night also.

    I'm sympathetic to all the parties involved. This homeowner and the kids family will have to live with this the rest of their lives. I know it would bother me.....a lot.
    • Feb 2013
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    #204 !Report
    DrFunkenstein wrote: #14
    q
    Another reason why morons shouldn't have access to a gun. Shooting someone to take their life has to have more meaning that "he was trespassing" or "he was stealing my cabbage". There has to be more value to a person's life and there has to guns taken away from morons. Sorry morons but you have n...
    I fail to understand how a teenager breaks a bunch of laws and ends up dead and that's a tragedy, but you consider a murdered fetus a victory for women's rights. To quote you "...life has to have more making than that." You need help.
    • Feb 2013
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    #205 !Report
    jmiller94 wrote: #204
    q
    I fail to understand how a teenager breaks a bunch of laws and ends up dead and that's a tragedy, but you consider a murdered fetus a victory for women's rights. To quote you "...life has to have more making than that." You need help.
    @jmiller94 well what is it? My home and property and the safety of myself and family isn't worth the life of someone who would threaten it? Or abortion is taking life because life is inconvenient and therefore it's morally reprehensible? Huh Mr. Pro Choice? How is some life more valuable than other life? Hoe is killing in defense of your home against intruders wrong but murdering babies who never did anything wrong okay? That's why no one takes you seriously. You're more wishy washy than Mitt Romney.
    • Nov 2012
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    #206 !Report
    A drunken 16yo wandering loose after midnight - so many ways to die. Gun politics are peripheral to the story.
    • May 2012
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    #207 !Report
    WMCOL wrote: #79
    q
    You can't second guess this homeowners reaction. There was an intruder. It was believed to be a threat to lives of those inside house. When I was 13 a many attempted to enter my house late at night through a window to my room. I grabbed a shotgun and when I returned the man was trying to co...
    @WMCOL
    You definitely can second guess. There is such a thing as being reasonable. Was it reasonable for the homeowner to think he needed to use lethal force? If not then I don't care what he believed or how he felt. Reason separates humans from animals and we are responsible for exercising it. If he didn't exercise it appropriately it should be considered murder.
    • Nov 2012
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    #208 !Report
    DrFunkenstein wrote: #32
    q
    @Medicinebow I know, it's terrible! A teenage neighbor got confused and snuck into what he thought was his home so it gives the gun owner full right to MURDER him. What about "threat" don't you understand. As with all cowards, that gun owner looked in the room saw movement and started firing off ...
    @DrFunkenstein I have an IQ of 147. I am a veteran police officer and instruct firearms at the police academy. I also study and instruct constitutional law, teach concealed weapons classes for concealed handgun permits and I am approved to do so by the circuit court in my state. There is nothing cowardly about defending your home and family. In my experience in law enforcement anyone who "makes a plan" that involves trying to run from the intruder in their home will fare far worse than someone who plans to defend themselves. The idea that you should run from an intruder in your own home falls in line with the opinion that a dead victim is superior to a live person with a gun and a dead attacker. As police officers we can't be there every time someone needs to be defended. The Supreme Court has ruled that we have no duty to defend the individual. Most times we are simply historians who arrive after the crime and attempt to find the guilty party. I would much rather arrive to find a dead assailant that a raped, dead or raped and dead victim.
    • Jun 2012
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    #209 !Report
    WMCOL wrote: #79
    q
    You can't second guess this homeowners reaction. There was an intruder. It was believed to be a threat to lives of those inside house. When I was 13 a many attempted to enter my house late at night through a window to my room. I grabbed a shotgun and when I returned the man was trying to co...
    @WMCOL

    You've contradicted yourself by your own story. You gave this man a chance. You warned him first and he obeyed you. Had he made further threatening advances, then you had a right to shoot.

    I will always give benefit of the doubt to the deceased first in a case like this because they can't speak for themselves. Were I on a jury I would want to know what the shooter did to avoid taking someone's life as a first response to a crisis. I agree that no one should be climbing through someone else's window, however, as in your case, you have to assess a situation and make certain there is a true threat before making a decision that takes someone's life.

    You were a very brave and level-headed 13 year old.
    • Jun 2012
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    #210 !Report
    nomocrap wrote: #208
    q
    @DrFunkenstein I have an IQ of 147. I am a veteran police officer and instruct firearms at the police academy. I also study and instruct constitutional law, teach concealed weapons classes for concealed handgun permits and I am approved to do so by the circuit court in my state. There is nothing ...
    @nomocrap

    If you're all you say, then you know you don't pull that trigger unless you intend to kill someone. And until you know the full scope of situation you can't determine if pulling the trigger is worth it.

    My step-son surprised us a couple weeks ago by showing up from England unannounced. I'm home alone and I hear the screen door open and the front door start opening. Scared me half to death. I jumped up and ran to the top of the stairs, intent on throwing everything I could get my hands on at whoever was coming in my house. Had I had a gun in my hand would I have accidentally shot my own stepson as he came through the door?

    Police officers are trained to assess a situation, not shoot blindly in the dark. Most gun-wielding homeowners are half-trained (if any) at hitting a target, but when they are faced with a possible threat the adrenaline starts pumping and they can't separate threat from reality. That's a recipe for tragedy.
    • Mar 2013
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    #211 !Report
    Classified wrote: #45
    q
    He would be spending the rest of his life in prison if it happened in North Carolina, where you can shoot and kill someone as the are breaking in, but the moment they get in, you have to prove they were a threat, taking action only if attacked.
    @Classified...Here's my take on the matter, I'd rather be tried by 11 than carried by 6.
    • Dec 2012
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    #212 !Report
    Read in the news this morning some more details about the incident. Seems the homeowner vocally challenged the intruder. There was a warning shot fired. And the kid continued climbing the stairs toward a bedroom occupied by more of the shooter's family, even walking right past the shooter to continue his little trip. Sounds like the shooter was incredibly right to finally put a bullet in the intruder. You just can't get more 'fair' than what the shooter did.
    • Dec 2012
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    #213 !Report
    DrFunkenstein wrote: #184
    q
    @jessejaymes You know that's not a reliable website, shame on you. I thought you'd have better sense than that. The fact is that the overwhelming majority of home invaders do not carry any type of weapon and most of the time when they shoot and kill someone, they get the weapon from the home owne...
    @DrFunkenstein Wow. What kinda drugs do you partake of before you make up your facts?
    • May 2012
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    #214 !Report
    Zazziness wrote: #87
    q
    So according to "gun enthusiasts" this kid is just collateral damage. There was no possible solution to the home entry but executing a death sentence. SMH.
    The homeowner was obeying the law the intruder(the kid) was not. Has much more to do with rule-of-law enthusiasts than "gun enthusiasts". We are a nation under rule-of-law.
    • May 2012
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    #215 !Report
    It is simply astounding that some condemn this shooter for complying with the law and praise the intruder for breaking the law by thinking he is entitled to do what he did and not suffer the consequences he did.
    • Nov 2012
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    #216 !Report
    WMCOL wrote: #214
    q
    The homeowner was obeying the law the intruder(the kid) was not. Has much more to do with rule-of-law enthusiasts than "gun enthusiasts". We are a nation under rule-of-law.
    @WMCOL So far in earlier comments, you have told me you put your pride and your material possessions ahead of human life. We have such different philosophies about morality, I think it's hard for us to communicate.
    • Feb 2013
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    #217 !Report
    In 1988, Carl Rowan, a notoriously anti-gun syndicated newspaper columnist, shot a teenage boy for SWIMMING in his swimming pool on June 14, 1988. To top it all off, the gun he used was unregistered, contrary to local laws where Mr. Rowe lived. I don't recall anti-gun folks ever making a big deal out of that case. This is another example of hypocrisy and double standards. Tragedies happen every day of the week. In November 2012 alone, 4 police officers were shot by fellow officers. 2 of them died. A considerable number of police officers are also shot with their own guns; some shoot themselves by accident. Should we disarm all of them too? Believe it or not, civilians shoot fewer people by mistake than police officers do!
    • May 2012
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    #218 !Report
    Zazziness wrote: #216
    q
    @WMCOL So far in earlier comments, you have told me you put your pride and your material possessions ahead of human life. We have such different philosophies about morality, I think it's hard for us to communicate.
    @Zazziness
    Nope, never said I put "material possessions" ahead of life. Self-defense and obeying law comes before all else is what I said. I merely mentioned some of the consequences of leaving a place unattended without offering that as a reason to defend oneself and members of household. You made that leap of "reason" with no basis for it.
    • Nov 2012
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    12,400c 21,643B 22u
    #219 !Report
    WMCOL wrote: #218
    q
    @Zazziness Nope, never said I put "material possessions" ahead of life. Self-defense and obeying law comes before all else is what I said. I merely mentioned some of the consequences of leaving a place unattended without offering that as a reason to defend oneself and members of household. Y...
    @WMCOL Then perhaps I misunderstood you. When I said I thought it more sensible to just escape the house so no one gets hurt, you said "No." You'd stand your ground and fend off an intruder with violence, if necessary, because the law says you can. To me, that is putting material possessions ahead of human life because you are choosing the violent solution when a peaceful solution is an option. How do you see it differently?
    • Jun 2012
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    #220 !Report
    Denizen_Kate wrote: #176
    q
    @marine1 - I selected the "Something else" option because this tragic incident has nothing to do with gun control laws. The 16 year old kid went out, drank too much, and instead of sneaking back into his own bedroom, he climbed through a neighbor's window. The neighbor, not knowing who he was but...
    @Denizen_Kate Agreed.....

Comments 201 to 220 of 270