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  • #3
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    No ban on anything has ever quelled the demand for the product. Keeping it illegal costs the state millions of dollars that could be used elsewhere, and even millions more in lost tax revenue.

    This seems like a simple decision
  • #40
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    The hypocrisy related to this issue is profound. That marijuana is still a schedule 1 drug in 30 states and at a federal level is financially nuts. Half the people incarcerated for drug offenses in our prison system today are there for marijuana violations. Then you add the lack of revenue from taxing this stuff and that too is in the billions. Just as we educate our kids about the use and abuse of alcohol and tobacco, and agree not to sell these products to minors, the same should be true of marijuana. The over use of weed in a young brain is bad news. But the time has come to legalize, tax, and educate people about this drug and stop by a society of hypocrites when it comes to its use.
  • #25
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    Yep. As an honest and true conservative I can't see how this is an issue. We have ample evidence that reasonable use of pot isn't harmful to society or individuals. If we want to go after it as a "gateway" drug then we had better back up to tobacco and beer first......those are where most addicts/abusers begin.

    I's neither my nor the government's business what a consenting adult does on their own time. If it is not harming others....and reasonable use of pot does not harm others.....it's not an issue.
  • #59
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    @Eric_S But the GOP hasn't or won't change until they can figure out how they or big business can exploit cannabis for profit, then they'll change.
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  • #60
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    I am an opponent of all prohibition type laws. All they do is create crime, smuggling, gangs, etc. We learned that lesson when Alcohol was prohibited. Our elected leaders are not wise enough to learn from the past so pass idiotic laws like these that accomplish nothing good, a lot bad, and are destructive to the society as a whole.
    Many of the laws can be called victimless crimes. There should be no such thing as a victimless crime.
  • #170
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    "Many of the laws can be called victimless crimes. There should be no such thing as a victimless crime. "
    That makes no sense. But legalizing Prostitution would be a step in the right direction.
  • #180
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    Define what you mean to me there are plenty of victimless crime because they are transactions between individuals for services or products. like prostitution.
  • #181
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    @CVX A willing transaction by two consenting adults? What makes that a crime except prohibition laws? Sorry. Ever read something that had "Life, Liberty, and The Pursuit of Happiness". They made a law about it in most of the state. That is the same as the laws they had about abortions, the use of birth control, smoking marijuana, and dozens more. It is the law that is a crime.
  • #64
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    "I think we need to stay alert, if not 24 hours a day, more than some of the potheads might be able to put together."

    I've just sent an angry email to Gov. Brown on his use of this negative, ignorant stereotype. He should be ashamed of himself.
  • #50
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    Absurd that it wasn't done 30-50 years ago...
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    I like Jerry Brown but what about all the wasted lives spent in prison for associating with a plant???
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    I would rather be around a snoring stoner than a roaring drunk any day!!! LOL
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    I would also like to stop subsidizing organized crime...
  • #15
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    I doubt the number of pot smokers would change much. I think that more citizens would just come out of the green closet.
  • #68
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    I think you're wrong on that. If legalized, I think there are many who would try it just out of curiosity, those that have been too paranoid to try it illegally.
  • #22
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    @jdl51

    Childish insults aside, my comment was more toward the story selection than anything. Look at the front page of this site over time. The story selection has been increasingly oriented to trivial matters.
  • #31
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    @Thunderchicken It's an opinion site. There's lots of topics people have opinions on. This is just one of them. Pot legalization has turned the corner the past year and there are quite a few people interested in how it's all going to shake out. Maybe spending hundreds of billions over the past few decades for failed law enforcement and incarceration, sending billions south to drug cartels with all the death and destruction that entails, not to mention the damage to those who have a criminal record for possessing a plant might be a trivial matter to you but there are many who think it's not trivial at all and think that the law needs to be changed. All that aside, you have the option to not click on the link when a topic pops into your mailbox that you're not interested in. Just think of it as spam.
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  • #29
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    It's an f'ing plant that grows wild for chrissake. Outlawing marijuana is tantamount to outlawing carrots. All botanicals were put on earth to be used by us (The Biblical "dominion" concept). Making them illegal belies our status as a "Christian" nation. Fun Fact: Although we have the First Amendment/religious freedom thing, we do not recognize Rastafarianism as a legitimate religion yet Catholics (a "recognized" religion) can legally permit underage drinking (alcohol consumption) in the name of Holy Communion.
  • #154
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    He wont legalize it ... its just a ploy to get votes...Once in he would never get the GOP to go for it so dont be fooled by his rhetoric.
  • #81
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    As a Californian, I can tell you this will make absolutely no difference in anything for the following reasons:

    - most California police departments are forbidden by City policy to enforce anti-marijuana laws except for large scale dealers or where there are other mitigating circumstances (cocaine or other drugs present as well).

    - ANYBODY with $50 can get a medical marijuana license in 15 minutes. If you want to smoke it, the license lets you do so with impunity.
  • #132
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    Until it's available wherever adults can purchase tobacco and alcoholic beverages, there is WORK to be done. Store clerks check IDs; street dealers, not so much.
  • #164
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    @RSteeb I don't know about where you live, but they're constantly arresting store clerks for selling booze and cigs to minors here. And there are pot "dispensaries" all over the place.
  • #165
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    That's how liquor stores LOSE their LICENSE. And you cannot enter a medicinal Cannabis dispensary without a physician's rec.
  • #172
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    @RSteeb Yes, that's how it's SUPPOSED to work. They're running a "sting"almost every week and have no trouble finding violators who close for a week and reopen with "new" management only to get stung again. And as far as the script? That's a joke.$50, 15 minutes, and tell him you get headaches and you've got your prescription. Everybody knows that.
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  • #71
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    It's just common sense. There never was any valid reason to ban marijuana. If somebody wants to toke up, that's not my problem.
  • #61
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    The problem with the American politicians is that they do not listen just like their counterparts in the UK. When the UK authorities were notified several years ago through their then Home Secretary David Blunkett and the Home Office (empowered to address the hard drug addiction scourge in Britain) that a humane cure was available from Vietnam and with no 'cold turkey', they simply did not want to know because apparently the giant pharmaceuticals did not want it to be available behind closed doors because it would hit their bottom line to the tune of tens of billions every year. Therefore the ministers and Whitehall did nothing but continued the maintenance regimes that hardly cure for the billions pumped into the UK drugs treatment regimes every year. You see vast wealth and power surmount human suffering in our politician’s minds and people had better get used to how our politicians think (or are told to do) whether that is the UK, the USA or any other nation for that matter. That is why the non-performing drug treatments will simply just continue to treat and not cure in the millions that is required to stem this ever-growing hard drugs epidemic - http://worldinnovationfoundation.blogspot.co....

    Dr David Hill
    Chief Executive
    World Innovation Foundation
  • #49
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    Pot should never have been made illegal from the start. Legalize and regulate all drugs. Those with high addictive potential should be prescribed by doctor, and addiction should be a matter of health and cure, not jails: that's a total nonsense. It benefits only to criminals and terrorism.
  • #112
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    The problem is that it is not a drug. Its a herb.
    Second, I will never pay a tax on it. I will grow it before I do.
  • #140
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    @BillS I agree, especially if you define drug by "toxic and addictive". But the term "drug" means nothing but illegal medication. The illegality is driven by special interests, and has no reason based on any health concerns for the citizen. Prohibition is an invention of bandits, and benefits only to bandits.
  • #197
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    @Bruno24 I do know and agree what prohibition is and was. We never learned after alcohol.
    But as per my Natural medicine classes I took, in the medical books, it is defined as an herb. As an herb is defined as a wooded or pulpy plant and that plant falls in that category. So its an herb. I wouldn't call anything addictive a drug, as a drug is defined as "a chemical derived in a lab" and marijuana is not developed in no lab and neither is sex, another thing a person can be addicted to.
  • #208
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    I would say that the bandits learned a lot from the failure of alcohol prohibition. They learned that if a drug is dangerous, it became much more dangerous when prohibited. So to make benefits a long time, better to prohibit something innocuous.
    I am not quite sure about the opposition natural and artificial, it exists but is a bit ... artificial, as it is us who made it, and nature collects well numerous poisons, which BTW are legal, of course. But I relate to your point somehow. I love plants.
  • #37
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    Heaven forbid!!! Next thing we'll see on Topix is Michigan Republicans require you buy 'rape insurance' before you are raped!
  • #116
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    Well, I can answer that for you.
    I have been smoking it for 21 years. And obviously supported it 21 years ago, and since I still smoke, then it looks like we would support it 20 years later. I don't see that changing anytime soon.
  • #137
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    You're making me laugh, Ok, What I was wondering about is all the legal and cultural changes involved with it.
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