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  • #1
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    Congratulations on shedding government oppression and letting adults make this decision for themselves, legally, while taking business from cartels and gaining tax revenues. Bravo!
  • #27
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    I sure hope that's sarcasm, because the requirement to get approval from the government for a license to sell marijuana is still subjection of the people the government (aka oppression) - the State giveth and the State taketh away.
  • #34
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    @TheSaltMiner It's better than letting cartels run the market...this is a step in the right direction. It has worked very well here in Colorado.
  • #52
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    Oh yeah, money is soooo important, who cares what happens as long is adults make the decision for themselves. That is so important.

    Hi guy, I'm up and full of coffee.
  • #71
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    @Now_What Definitely the right direction, but I won't be celebrating the shedding of government oppression for a long, long time. Especially here in SC where these nuts keep spreading rumors about weed-induced schizophrenia and violent behaviors...
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  • #144
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    @LonePalm - Actually, and oddly enough, if you count DC plus the six official U.S. Territories, it is 57, just not all of them are states.
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  • #6
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    End the war on drugs.
    Decriminalize drugs.

    It will remove money, guns and power from cartels, gangs, and political corruption.
    It will greatly reduce gang violence and end drug war violence, which will save the lives of children and adults.
    It will protect children since there will not be a monetary incentive for dealers to push drugs.

    Less fathers will be in prison, therefore more fathers will be with their children and families.
    More kids will attend school since there will not be the easy money from dealing drugs to lure them into leaving school.

    It will remove money from the inner city gangs which will in turn, make it much harder for gang members to purchase guns.
    It will free up money that was used on law enforcement to be used for drug education and treatment. Also freed up resources could be shifted to law enforcement in Murder, Rape, Pedophilia, Human Trafficking, Violent Assault, Burglary and Border Security.

    It will remove the problem of drug smugglers crossing the border illegally and lessen the danger to border security and residents of border towns.
    Court expenses will be reduced from the reduction in cases.
    States expenses will be reduced because they will need fewer jails.
  • #17
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    Dream on, whether legal or illegal cash strapped users will still rob and kill to get the drug. law enforcement will only have to shift to investigate apprehend and prosecute, filling up the jails will only cost taxpayers more money. The Drug Cartel will not lose one cent and thrive.
  • #24
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    @Adolf

    Perhaps you can point me to hard statistics that show marijuana *users* have robbed or killed to get their pot.

    I've been following this issue for over 2 decades and the only robbing or killing I'm familiar with involve dealers rather than users.

    I'd also like to understand your reasoning regarding the survival of the black market for marijuana. The black market for alcohol didn't last for long after alcohol prohibition was repealed. Why do you think marijuana will be different?
  • #29
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    @Adolf

    ...just like the prohibition gangsters still rob and kill to get booze?

    California does not have legal recreational marijuana precisely because the ones selling it illegally did not want it to become legal because they saw their profits going up in smoke sold to buyers by the legal, regulated sellers.
  • #38
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    @FreedomWriter "Why do you think marijuana will be different?"
    One thing. Over taxation.
    In Colorado, pot sold in legal shops for $400 cost $280 on the street. That's a huge tax.
    The only bright spot is the 6 plant personal allowance.....
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  • #2
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    I'm still a bit leery. Despite Republicans claims of support for state's rights, I'm still concerned about what will happen to people if a "law and order" Republican gets into office. Holder and Obama haven't been particularly supportive of legalization but it could get a whole lot worse.

    It needs to be legalized on a federal level so there is no ambiguity and people aren't at the mercy of opinions from a temporary administration.
  • #41
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    I share your concern and think we need to push DC to deregulate, decriminalize, or legalize soft drugs sales and usage. All it takes is some hard ass, nanny politician, or regulating agency to reverse course on this issue.
  • #104
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    I think you have much more to fear from a radical Left Wing Democratic administration, one such as Hillary Rodham Clinton might herald. Bill Clinton's early actions as soon as the took over was to order an IRS Audit of the NRA with the intent to gut it if irregularities were found. Under Hillary Rodham Clinton, I would expect her to sign an Executive Order (unless President Obama does it just before he leaves office) empowering the BATFE and the DHS to obtain sales records of Medical Marihuana users, and any records of anyone else who's bought Marihuana legally in the states where it is permitted, and then establishing a 'registry'. Next, I see them visiting the much smaller number of Federal Firearms Licensee holders in the USA and photocopying the records of all persons who've bought firearms in the past 10 years or so. THEN I envision them comparing the medical marihuana users and any other legal marihuana buyer with the registry of gun owners that have bought firearms in the past 10 years to find people on BOTH lists, and then TA-DA!: Home visits by the BATFE in order to confiscate the firearms of anyone whose name appears as a gun owner and a marihuana buyer under the Federal Law that prohibits the common possession of firearms and drugs. 18 U.S. Code Subsection 922, and Court Precedents: US v Patterson, US v. McCowan, & U.S. v Roach (ironic name for Defendant, lol)@N0rthman @SAS86
  • #105
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    @N0rthman I had an idea for a brand of 'super-sized' fatties: "Ascended Masters" (remember 'Dutch Masters'?) These would be HUGE like full-sized stogies and would definitely provide a 'Rocky Mountain High'- hence the name: ASCENDED MASTERS, lol
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  • #8
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    No doubt there will be those who will overdo it and stay high all the time, and those who drive while spaced out, but alcohol does all that and more. Jailing people for using or selling pot has been a waste of time, and this seems be the best way to deal with pot.
  • #4
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    I still think it's absolutely batshit crazy that in a country founded upon "freedom" that you can be arrested and have your life ruined for doing something that only harms yourself. I can understand the nanny state democrats wanting to keep it illegal but the small limited government republicans wanting to initiate force and lock people up for harming themselves is crazy and obviously shows there is no difference between the "two" parties. When I say republicans an democrats I'm referring to those who hold office not us peasants.
  • #5
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    Uh... I hate to force reality into your fantasy but while Democrats have not been eager to legalize it, Republican politicians have been batshit crazy on the subject. Nixon, in particular, really did seem to believe every bit of reefer madness he heard. During the Bush years, federal raids on California growers and medical dispensaries were relentless and they didn't give two figs if you were a cancer patient in a wheelchair.

    (Not that it's been much better under Obama -- politicians in general are reluctant to be "soft on crime" and there are still old people who think that's exactly what marijuana is.)
  • #7
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    @Zazziness Here's some reality for your fantasy, find where I said one side was better than the other in my statement.
  • #12
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    @Libertyiskey One side is better than the other one. I expressed myself poorly. Unfortunately, on this issue, the degree of difference is the Democrats are reluctant (though not totally unwilling) to arrest terminally ill patients while the Republicans will throw them in the pokey without hesitation.
  • #23
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    @Zazziness "...while the Republicans will throw them in the pokey without hesitation."
    Cite Sources Providing supporting links and including other opinions is often helpful in posting about politics; just be sure to cite your sources
  • #30
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    @Zazziness - I hate to force reality into your fantasy but @Libertyiskey didn't single out Democrats or Republicans in his comment.

    And I agree with it... Congress has had many chances over the last 50 years to repeal drug laws, and none have made any serious effort to do so. They are ALL batshit crazy.
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  • #21
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    Keeping it illegal forces teenagers to buy it from criminals and I would prefer my kids have no association with criminal elements at all. Telling teenagers they can't do something makes them want to and if you look at Holland where less teenagers try pot than Americans, it makes sense to remove the incentive.
  • #63
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    I actually meant to vote you up, my bad. And thats exactly the case here. It was SO much easier for us to get a couple G's of marijuana than it was to get alcohol when i was fifteen. And we were exposed to other drugs.
  • #68
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    Its damn time we as citizens of this country had a say and the damn government takes a backseat, its time we tell the DEA to take marijuana off the controlled list but wait the DEA, cops, judges, attorneys and privatized prisons will have to find other revenue cash crops , they have been using marijuana bust for the past 50 years to get their revenue and put citizens behind bars.
  • #150
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    I believe there was an article recently stating that the DEA has asked to have cannabis removed from the Schedule 1 drug list, and most police officers either don't really care one way or the other, or want it to be legal. It's lawyers and our for-profit prison system that are the major obstacles, along with organized crime and the pharmaceutical industry.
  • #182
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    Thank you for sharing your insight on this, I am 63 years old and now retired, My grandmother back in the mid sixties knew this miracle plant had many benefits to offer.
  • #209
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    @thunder1951 - I've been using "medical marijuana" for just over a year, and have been able to cease using four prescription meds. Always follow the money. Making it illegal in the first place, and keeping it illegal, was never about anything other than money.
  • #101
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    They got this wrong. There should have been no need to "legalize" it and bury it with bureaucracy. They only needed to repeal laws that criminalize it and let people be free to grow, sell and use marijuana without government involvement at all.
  • #131
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    What about making it legal to "grow your own"? No taxes on that, no "cartels" involved, no violence (unless somebody comes around to steal it!). The government would probably keep that illegal, just like making moonshine, because they couldn't get their "cut".
  • #140
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    Yeah. Around here they're talking about just legalizing it in oil form that you can buy. Growing & possessing plants will still be illegal & the oil doesn't come from the sky you have to have plants. i.e. you have to buy it from them/ taxed, etc.
  • #153
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    Currently here in CA, if you are authorized for Medical Marijuana, you are also authorized to grow up to two plants for your own use.

    Personally, I would like to see across-the-nation decriminalization, with no regulation at all. It's a plant, for pity's sake.
  • #129
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    Each state should make their own decision based on the choice of the voters in that state. The Feds need to keep their noses out of it!
  • #130
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    When 3 out of 4 citizens want the federal law changed. Where are our representatives. How many were voted in with that high of a percentage.
  • #77
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    Make money for your state by taxing the stuff, saving money by not locking people up, and openly educating people about the downside risks effects of pot seems like a win-win-win to me.
  • #14
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    When I want to have a good time and enjoy myself, I much prefer doing it naturally, not with artificial means like tobacco, alcohol, or drugs. In my opinion, it is far healthier.
  • #125
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    Agreed. I've never done drugs, smoked or drank in my life, and don't plan to.

    That said, I do still support legalization.
  • #233
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    @Saving_USA ...You saying you never even had a beer?...Are you connected to some religious cult that prohibits its members to imbied a little wine, as Jesus and St Paul said WE can do?..Or is it just a personal choice that you think makes you a more moral human being?...Not that i care, its your life and i support your choice's. But as i read your comment, i was thinking...Such a boring life this person must have.. Peace!
  • #234
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    @BibleTruth
    LOL. Definitely not religious.

    Mostly, in the case of drugs and alcohol, I just dislike the idea of willingly giving up any of my senses, even for a brief period of time. Me and my parents lived with my grandparents for a lot of my life growing up. My grandpa smoked a lot and had serious longue problems as a result. When I was sixteen, I walked in to find him dead in the living room. Needless to say, I don't need much more of a reason not to pick up a smoke.

    If I want to have fun, there's a near infinite number of games online, most of which are free (Just look at this shit:
    ). I also play nonfree video games, read books, and occasionally write... Stuff. I don't need some artificial high or buzz to enjoy myself.
  • #235
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    @BibleTruth
    I agree with you that a moderate amount of wine is in conformity with the Scriptures, just like moderation in everything we eat and drink. My church uses wine for communion, and I enjoy a half glass when having a meal with friends.(I have to be careful because I don't support alcohol well and because I have alcoholism on both sides of my family.)
    If someone chooses not to drink alcohol, I consider that their prerogative.
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  • #73
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    And keeping the marijuana prices sky high lets the cartels keep the cheap heroine flowing and subjects the younger people to use it due to the high marijuana prices.
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