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  • #17
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    SAy it aint so....you mean somebody coming out of school with a degree in "General Studies", "Sociology", "Psychology" "Liberal Arts" are under employed? Whodda thunk it?
  • #33
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    Most sociology jobs require a lot more than just a Bachelors degree, so anyone that doesn't plan on going and getting at least a Masters degree in the field has set themselves up for failure... unless their dual majoring and their other major is in demand at the undergraduate level.

    Certifications are also critical these days. If your going to work anywhere around IT you should have at least a Security+, if your going to manage projects you should have a PMP. Someone with a CISSP certification these days can usually find an IT job a lot easier than someone with a computer science degree... although having both is even better.
  • #36
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    @MarkColwell Yes...sociologist typically go on for graduate degrees, then the enter the job market in a low paying occupation. So yes...I can see how someone with this degree would feel underemployed.
  • #43
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    @MarkColwell So true about certifications. My former neighbor, an IT admin, just had certs, and no computer science degree. He's doing quite well.
  • #50
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    @methinks If you view a college education as a means to an economic ends, then would I agree that a dual major or a minor in the Humanities is beneficial. However if one chooses to just major in a Humanities subject, then they might want to familiarize themselves on how to brew a good cup of coffee.
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  • #32
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    It's sad when an engineering degree can't even get you a place in the middle class since most of those jobs have gone to India and China. Viva capitalism!(Crickets)
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  • #8
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    I'm not at all surprised that the least unemployed are all folks with STEM degrees. The days when basket weaving and liberal arts led to good jobs are pretty much gone.
  • #65
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    It's not that there are so many jobs, but so few people in the field.

    IOW, jobs that actually deal with people are losing, while corporate profits jobs are winning.
  • #88
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    Actually stats show that Lib Arts majors handle changes in the economy better then many specialists. I remember a few years ago when Engineerers were unemployed and my uncle got dumped by Boeing.
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  • #5
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    @vws

    Resume hell. The way this new company is hiring people and bringing retires back on contract, I'm looking for ward to retirement and maybe a lucrative contract offer. Some of my old coworkers are making more by being retired and working a couple of days a week that they were working 40 hours and overtime.(We've been understaffed for a long time now. My backlog list probably goes back fifteen years.)
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  • #24
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    What I find disillusioning is how many people graduate from college and turn out to be dumber than plants. My degrees are in business, I worked in IT for many years and now I own three companies.
  • #57
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    @AceLuby I keep forgetting that you read my posts and I have to explain everything to you so here goes... They have to to with college being both relevant and irrelevant to getting a good job. I worked in a field unrelated to my curriculum and used that experience to launch businesses that my degree helped to achieve. Thanks for being a fan!
  • #124
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    A lot of truth in what you say. The world belongs to those who dare.
    But, remember this...many plants are very resilient once their roots are established...they just don't handle drought or bugs very well and never leave one spot on their own. Moral to that is, "Don't hire too many plants." Especially Kudzus.
  • #3
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    Why would this surprise us? It's almost exactly what I figured before I saw the graph.....although, I'm almost certain that regardless of your college degree it's very unlikely that you will face a 50-60% unemployment rate...as the graphic implies
  • #20
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    It's "underemployement", not unemployement....and unlike unemployment, the definition of underemployment is somewhat subjective. I work with some young kids that are 1 year out of business school, making a decent wage $70-85K and think they are underemployed because they weren't even considered for the mid career management position that opened up in our organization. So yes....i don't find the 50-60% figure unrealistic.
  • #31
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    NO...that is extreme. Now if you said 100% at some point feel unappreciated in their positions, then I would agree with you. I generally feel well compensated for my position, but frequently not appreciated.
  • #90
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    @JackinVienna I noticed the under vs. un. Many people want job satisfaction not just a salary. My brother & best friends both made more then me most of our careers. Yet I was the one happy going to work..
  • #126
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    It depends upon whether you are willing to relocate. Conditions in the more depressed areas of the country skew the statistics. Maybe they should be called outliers on the chart.
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  • #42
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    I find it shocking how many people don't blame their degree and a lack of education in useful fields as the cause of their own under-employment.
  • #89
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    Nursing is a job that has it's ups & downs too. Currently around here experienced nurses are wanted but many new grads look quit a while getting their first one. Hospitals don't want to train. My relative got one quickly but she had graduated #1 in her class but 4 years after graduating she has classmates working at 1/2 her salary.
  • #118
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    @Frosty45 Well then tell them to work in a nursing home or a doctor's office. Even schools have nurses then there is Home Health and a wide variety of other good jobs out there for nurses. The hospitals ain't the only store in town.
  • #125
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    @Frosty45 It's the same in engineering fields. Young graduates must "crawl before they walk." Entry level jobs are not always where you want them to be and they sure as hell don't pay what your professor told you they would.
    When economic times are tough no company likes to train inexperienced employees.
  • #142
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    @seedtick In her nursing school they were constantly warned about getting the first job without any real information that the quality of the work and scores/grades would make a huge difference so she jumped on the 1st offer that a 2nd rate hospital made after graduation requiring a response before she could even interview someplace else. The place that hired her never kept their promises. She had the good luck of getting a health problem that a Dr. told her how to turn into a contract breaker and escaped. Had a better job at more money as soon as she left.

    My Son's HS buddy majored in Chemical engineering and had a job before he had his degree at a great salary. The company went belly up 6 months later and he had a new job 2 weeks later at more money. He was also a top grad from his University.
  • #144
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    @blue_yahoo Those 8-5 nursing jobs outside of hospitals are highly sought after. Beat the hell out of shift work.

    Top medical job these days is Being a Physical Therapist. One I had in home said she got nearly a daily phone or mail offer to change jobs. An intern I had at a clinic said he had 20 offers his final semester. Liked the idea of being able to choose the location he wanted to live.
  • #23
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    i blame the gov for all the unneeded import workers as causing most all under and unemployment. as it stands many who apply though fully skilled and qualified there is something going on where a company will import the worker and stabbing the citizens in the back,something that could not be done without both parties fully supporting it.

    it comes down to the jobs that cannot be shipped out of the USA they import workers to keep from hiring citizens.
  • #67
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    The reason why H1B immigrants from India make better tech employees is that they're more obedient and work longer hours without charging for those extra hours. They have a better attitude towards their job, because, if they lose their job, they lose their right to stay in the USA. Companies need employees who have more motive to conform and obey, than just their salaries. The federal government enforces the employees' attitudes, by the implied threat of deporting them if they mess up. And that's exactly what hiring managers want. The hiring manager's main motive is always to build his organization within the company, without drama, because, the more people he has working under him without drama, the higher and more reliable his position in the company.
  • #68
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    It's actually the same reason why some guys get mail-order brides. They want a wife to be obedient, without drama, so they get one from a country where women respect them more.
  • #114
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    You are blaming the wrong people. You should be blaming the "corporations are people" bullshit than the government since its the companies themselves making those decisions.
  • #119
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    @Starsplash the gov has full control over who comes on visa,that is all on them. we cannot blame the corps for what they do when it all falls on the corrupt who have turned against citizens for a buck.

    the gov does not even go after companies they know commit visa fraud shows they fully support it.
  • #37
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    The chart does not surprise me. Law (lawyers) in my opinion do guarantee workload for themselves by way of government regs. It's no surprise that most Washington bureaucrats and congress are lawyers who self promote their careers.
  • #158
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    Although lawyers do create legal work through "creative law", even so, this profession has been grossly overpopulated for more than 30 years. When I was in law school, the accepted wisdom was that, in an average size city, there needed to be at least 650 people per lawyer, for the lawyers to make a reasonable living. When I entered law in 1973, there were about 160,000 lawyers in the country, and there was no shortage of lawyers. It passed one million several years ago. A number of lawyers have left the profession for lack of employment, even though they always have the theoretical possibility of hanging their own shingle. I did. It is enjoyable, but not much of a way to make a living. Law schools seem to always cover up the piss poor employment prospects, when they are recruiting students. I have real doubts about the accuracy of these stats when it comes to law. When you see lawyers filling the airwaves with ads, that is not a sign of prosperity, but of desperation. I know many are paying out more for advertising than they put in their own pocket.
  • #174
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    @coyote505 I agree that there is an abundance in the USA. I know non practicing lawyers who are now in Real Estate sales or insurance agents for example. Passing the bar could also push them in a different direction. The chart however shows them as the least underemployed side.
  • #18
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    Yes, that's why I'm back in school for my second Master's degree. The problem is, most folks these days think that their education ends forever on Graduation Day. Good luck with that!
  • #9
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    The only surprise was that Marine Biology was not at the top of the list. As for the rest, there are schools pumping out barely trained people in all those fields and it also proves that just any college degree is not very useful. Most of the ones that are leading to employment are the soft liberal programs while most of the ones that are leading to employment is the hard science such as engineering. Even with the number of schools pumping out "computer engineers", the need in that field is still growing.
  • #61
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    It not only has to do with the specialty but what school it's from. Some schools are much more highly regarded than others. A business degree from podunk college isn't as highly regarded as one from U of Chicago or Harvard.
  • #81
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    @SAS86 What makes you think that a podunk college is less respected than the U of Chicago? I could understand Harvard, but the U of Chicago. Tell you the truth, it is the first time I have even heard of them.
  • #82
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    @Tina My niece graduated from U Chi and started at a major financial firm in NYC at more than half a mil. I think that is pretty good and they understood U Chi even if you don't.
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  • #71
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    I was a mechanical engineer. Didn't have any problem finding a job. The only problem was picking which one I wanted.
  • #115
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    Engineer's never had a problem finding a job. Its an occupation that is desperately needed in the US. Always has been.
  • #35
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    I still am glad that I got my degree in geography because it has led to other things and opportunities. My kids both selected science: one a masters in forensic science which led to a bio-safety career at a large Ivy League university and the other is finishing up on a Ph.D in geology. These aren't easily moved overseas, thank God.
  • #91
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    My son did the same in Geology. The highest paying jobs are in foreign countries like Saudi Arabia. Not that there aren't jobs in the USA that pay a comfortable wage particularly in oil areas.
  • #141
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    Short answer is that no matter what "edjewmakation" you have under your belt, if you have ever been arrested is more important than anything else in this society. Every corporation does background checks on every potential employee. If ACCUCHECK or whatever company they pawn off their services to, decides you might be arrested again or a risk then you don't get hired. This is without any convictions...just arrests.

    Second, nearly every corporation desires someone who is licensed in some way. You basically need permission from the state or from an association for you even to have gainful employment. Sounds like communism to me.
  • #131
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    I had a Liberal Arts degree and did just fine. I think it is far better to have a degree that allows some flexibility rather than one that locks you in to a narrow specialty that might get crowded.

    By the way.....some of the degrees being compared aren't really comparable because a large number of the "Least Underemployed" are graduate degrees that might have been earned by someone with one of the "Most underemployed" undergraduate degrees!
  • #112
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    I am started school next week with a business major. I already knew that statistic. I'm not afraid of underemployment. Real underemployment is working for your brother and so poor you have paper blinds for windows and sleep on a love seat in your living room over a year because you can't afford a bed. Underemployment is being paid by the county to do public speaking about your teen pregnancy once or twice a month. It's kind of like giving blood. Any underemployment a business degree gives me will make my life way comfortably happy. I have #10 cans of beans and rice for my levels of underemployment. I'm going to have a degree. Yay, me!
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