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  • #18
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    Anybody who does this, including a police officer who doesn't have a warrant should be prosecuted for invasion of privacy.
    In fact police who do this without a warrant deserve an even harsher sentence. It's about time we use the criminal justice system to protect people's constitutional liberties. Police and other public officials who trample over the Constitution should face real consequences for it. Disbarment from any position of public trust and a long prison sentence is in order.
  • #68
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    It is my opinion that most of what and where a private Citizen says and the way of conveying what is said should be held to a high degree of privacey. Athough that is not always the case. Just like this right now, We're are being monitored by some entity of the law. Monitoring of social networking has been going on for some time now. Before long every aspect of human life will be under the thumb of big brother.
  • #37
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    Thank you. People should be more aware of the privacy issues with online providers like Google, Facebook, et al. As your linked story says, we don't even get to KNOW what they share with government agencies.
  • #38
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    @Denizen_Kate also this is what they are admitting to,i read an article that said on average we were 5 years behind the info we are feed concerning military and secrecy projects,remember you are never alone with schizophrenia : }
  • #40
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    @MongoAPillager LOL...I remember when I was younger thinking all this 'secrecy' stuff was crazy, or the people
    believing it were...now, not so much.
  • #42
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    @mimi57 yep'i remember back in the early 90,s being labeled as a black helicopter nut,Militia nut,etc almost everything that was called wack job info is now pretty much main stream,of course Mongo still Wack job
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  • #13
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    As long as it doesn't get in the way of them trampling all over the rest of our constitutional rights. I'd hate to think that we're sidelining officers that could otherwise be pulling over old ladies with broken taillights.
  • #4
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    No! This is the beginning of martial law! Conversations over airwaves are just as private as regular ones! That is like the government placing microphones on everyone!!
  • #12
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    Radio data is not just as private as other means of communication. The FCC at one time had a provision (it may still be in effect) stating anyone had a right to receive any communication that was broadcast over the airwaves. At one point in time it changed and those receivers are no longer available. I do own a receiver that allows me to listed to cell phone broadcasts legally. If I was to listen to a call, determine a crime was taking place, report it to police - that may be admissible in court.
  • #20
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    @Your_Name_Here I know what you mean, my Dad always used to tap into cell phone calls, but what I mean is that a cell convo can be just as private as a regular one. And people should get respect and privacy in regular convos and cell ones to.
  • #2
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    I don't think they should be able to monitor any conversation without a warrant under any circumstances. But want to bet how this works out? I mean after all the Patriot act allows our govt to imprison us without charge, trial or attorney FOR LIFE. This is just another brick in the wall.
  • #56
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    The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Data = Papers Effects = Cellphones "How strangely will the Tools of a Tyrant pervert the plain Meaning of Words!" --Samuel Adams
  • #65
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    And how right was Mr. Adams? It's sad that the government can read the same words we do like congress shall pass no laws or shall not infringe upon and then just add a word like unless that is not written any where to justify there illegal behavior.
  • #67
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    @truthsayer - well said... despotism and tyranny are running our country these days... When we stop protecting and defending liberty, we have anything but a free country...
  • #33
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    Well, conservatives have long held that there is no right to privacy in the Constitution. Now their chickens are coming home to roost despite all the liberal opposition over the years.
  • #19
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    When my daughters were growing up i told them to go into electronic privacy law. they'd be on the cutting of our legal and technology systems...but noooo... they had to be nurses and teachers and help people...

    Ingrates. now whose gonna keep me living in the style I am used to when i'm old? guess it's up to my grandson and daughter now...

    :)
  • #7
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    A warrant is needed for data forensics. Listening to the idiot in the next stall talking on his phone is legal, disturbing but legal. Can't the person on the other end hear the flushing noises? Seems rude....and no I'm in there typing this :p
  • #64
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    No and hmm no. It goes beyond the limits of there powers. But as with everything else the government always exceeds it's limits. Oh wait a minute I forgot about the patriot act there are no limits. We are all considered potential terrorists. There are no rules for government.
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