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  • #2
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    What would help America's "disconnected" Youth?.....

    Maybe bringing back our manufacturing base and while we are at it, placing as much emphasis on graduating seniors into the trades as we do into college.
  • #13
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    That would be a great start. A better idea is to basically make university access free, abolish this whole student loan system and make college just the next step after high school. Or kids who are not the college type are sent to vocational schools to learn a trade. That would be a idea of GOOD spending. I'd have no problem paying higher taxes to make that system happen. Kids today are non-producing gimmedat wanting losers. Look at that tool playing pool with iPod earbuds? I see that constantly! Is music that important to your life? I see people constantly with earbuds!
  • #18
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    bs..manufacturing work.

    these kids have been ruined by the "everbody gets a trophy" philosophy of the left and the radical education department. they come out of high school thinking they are all special and gifted and they will not "settle" for entry level anything especially something as demeaning as assembly line work. they all think they should walk in tell the boss how they have computer skills and they should start somewhere near the penthouse
  • #25
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    @RobertJHarsh Everyone does not have to go to college and making it free would only encourage more children, totally unsuited for college, to go, it puts off making a decision for 4 years and leads to too many taking the easy road with easy courses and bogus majors so that 4 years and tons of money later, they STILL have no marketable skill. I do agree with most of the rest of your post. I also like abolishing the student loan system, not for your reason but because the guaranteed student loan system gives colleges the free rein to NOT keep costs down. I don't know if public schools have guidance counselors or not, but they would be a good addition to public education. Each child would be evaluated and pointed toward a doable career not some pie in the sky college degree promise to someone with excellent mechanical skills etc.
  • #27
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    @RobertJHarsh - Okay. Let's forget the earbuds. I hear ya and agree. I find it interesting that you are advocating a more Euro approach to education. I definitely agree with you. The one thing though would be to test the students out their senior year along with trying to find a career road they are interested in. Not every kid should go to college. But every kid should have an avenue open for them to pursue a meaningful and productive career. One thing we could do right away is to stop considering white collar work as more important to our society than blue collar. All labor is honorable. My father taught me that and he had a masters from Harvard.
  • #34
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    @MRMacrum I agree with you and @Tralee. Students should be tested in the junior and senior years of high school to determine college, vocational school, or other options. However, there are two very bad trends in America right now. One is the usual "if you don't go to college your worthless" propaganda. I make well into the six figures and I do not have a college degree. So I am not worthless and in fact, a producer that supports the deadbeats in America. Second, there is new trend flying under the radar about kids in middle school being assigned "career tracks" in 8th grade. What 8th grader knows what they want to be when they become an adult? ZERO. Something else that should be done is make high school like college. Instead of this rigid day students have to follow for four years how about letting student schedule classes and break up the year into quarters like the colleges do. Why should a kid sit through a class for 22 weeks when they can do it 10 to 11 and move on to the next set of classes? Maybe more kids can graduate early and get into college, or the work force. Schooling in the US needs to be modernized.
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  • #8
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    First and foremost we have to stomp out the "everybody gets a trophy" mentality. That's the root of the problem. Then parents need to spend time teaching their kids decent values and work ethic.
  • #10
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    Parents are doing a lousy job raising children. Children have no responsibility, no worries, no competition. They sit at home and play video games, or flit around to all kinds of fun activities. They have no concept of the real world and are ill prepared to deal with it when it confronts them.
  • #43
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    Has it occurred to anyone that these so called disconnected youths don't want to work and are content with being on the system the rest of their lives while someone else picks up the tab?

    Schooling or college isn't the problem ... most know how to work the system long before they ever get to high school and after watching their parents take advantage of the system ... why in hell would you expect them to do anything else!

    Why work when you can sit on your ass thanks to the bleeding heart liberals ... lol!
  • #38
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    How about a dose of "Get out of the house and play outside...."

    OR a few "You made the decision, now live with the consequences." pills.

    OR a tablespoonful of "If you want it, earn and save the money for it."

    OR a " Respect your elders..." sandwich washed down with a tall glass of "Respect is EARNED not demanded."

    I think maybe we need to hire some of the old folks sitting in old folks homes dying for something to do and let them teach PARENTING. Nobodies life is "Leave It To Beaver" and the sooner you accept that the happier you will be with what you have.

    Disconnected happens because they don't spend enough time unplugged.
  • #22
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    The word "disconnected" really does not fit here. The Generation Y kids are, in fact, very connected...just not connected in a "traditional" way. When I retired these kids were just coming into the work force. It is coincidental that my son and I recently had a conversation about this. He is a VP of global operations and is dealing with the college grads of this generation at the professional level. He says they are talented, but have a problem with traditional schedules...can't seem to make early morning meetings. But, when you make allowances for that they can excel at their jobs. He says that they will actually flood his mailbox with project updates and emails late at night. They tend to mix personal networking and work during traditional work hours but will also mix work with personal time during off hours. Born in 1971, my son has a very strong work ethic and expects the same from those who work for him. He gives me and his military experience credit for that. But, as a sensible executive, he recognizes what the question concerning these kids really is....do we struggle with productivity while we force these kids to conform...or do we make subtle changes to help them become productive members of the workforce? Managers can be flexible with professionals and white collar workers, but blue collar jobs on an assembly line or continuous process type operation demand strict compliance with schedules. The way I see it...War Babies like me or the early Baby Boomers will struggle to manage these kids...we tend to be very structured in business and industry. But, the Generation X managers like my son actually understand these Generation Y kids much better and may be able to "blend" them into the workforce.
  • #24
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    Very interesting observation. I noticed the gen Y attitude with the resident physicians I supervised. They could read and remember very easily, but whined and moaned when they were asked to complete surgery reports, inpatient charts, or outpatient clinic billing forms. They feel that "paperwork and other beaurocracy" is beneath them.
  • #33
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    @NormalFlora Your insight is very interesting, also. I had not thought about the medical field. But, your comments concerning "clerical type" work bring back the intergration of computers and cell phones into the workplace. At this point executives, middle managers, and engineers, were forced to input their own information/data and write their own correspondence. Many struggled and resisted this. They were used to having clerks and secretaries to do this.
  • #46
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    @NormalFlora Maybe they feel much of that work is beneath them because they've never had to suffer the consequences when those tasks aren't done. The devil's in the details and maybe what they need is to get bit in the a$$ as a direct result of ignoring those details.
  • #52
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    @NormalFlora

    How funny this should come up. I supervise a fellowship program. Duty hours, procedure logs, research updates...it's like pulling teeth. They are good clinicians, and they are far from overworked, but it's as if they think paperwork is something they just don't have to do. Good heavens, we computerized most of it. It's not like the even have to pick up a pencil.

    But, a have a few much older attendings who are the same way, so it's hard to say if it relates to youth or is just simply a lackadaisical attitude.
  • #61
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    @PayThatCEO Oh my god I had a program director who was so spineless that he told the residents that I would do the data entry in the ACGME procedure log. When the chair, who was NOT spineless, found out he said NFW.
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  • #28
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    I'm pretty sure they fall into the "low information" category and voted for the "Cool" Guy they saw on late night TV, being really cool man.
  • #20
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    Our military is in dire need of new recruits. Those with the qualifications should consider the military. Get training become a better person; a better AMERICAN with a better futuristic outlook. The military is not for everybody. Those that qualify should at least explore their options.
  • #19
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    This seems more of a personal mindset that has developed with their home life. Student loans ensure that almost everyone could go to collage. So I am not sure why they don't take advantage of that. Perhaps they don't want to go to collage and I can understand that as well. But they should also know that forgoing collage either leaves you with lower income jobs and entry level jobs that don't pay much (educated or not). It just seems as though these folks simply are failing at picking a path and pursuing it. While you can certainly change your path and many of us do the first step however is to get started. I am not sure how this mindset is changed if it doesn't begin at home.
  • #16
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    the deck is stacked against our youth for starter jobs. funny how els classes are free yet if you are an english speaker wanting to learn a new language you have to pay for it.
  • #51
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    I agree! The change needs to start in high school with the realization that not every kid is going to college. With that in mind, we can proceed to find practical avenues to lead these young adults into successful careers outside of a college degree. Credit for work programs with local businesses and classes geared more for adult responsibilities. Teaching them simple accounting, managing bills, planning for child expenses, etc. Skills they probably won't learn on they're own andskills their parents probably won't teach them.
  • #67
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    We should move education to the internet. It's easier to convince a kid not to drop out when they can attend class online. A few educational offices should be kept up for things like chemistry labs and then as part of an online course you would register to attend one.
    The benefits of online classes are innumerable. First you eliminate the geography problem. If 200 students want to take a class and they all live in completely different places, you have many classes whereas without the internet you would have no classes.
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