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  • #1
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    I'm not worried about being replaced by a robot. Those who work hard and keep their skills sharp know there will always be a need for their talents. Those who sit around and expect success to be handed to them are the ones that will be in the most danger. Humans will always have needs, and as long as you have the skills to fulfill those needs, you will have a job. obama is not frightening me with this propaganda.
  • #3
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    Agreed. What really scares me are knuckleheads like Krugman getting into positions of authority. Why does that guy keep getting interviewed for their opinions? Krugman is consistently WRONG, his predictions are WRONG, and frankly he is a socialist disguised as a economist.
  • #7
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    @RobertJHarsh Well for one thing Krugman has one more NOBEL PRIZE in economics than anyone posting around here.
  • #8
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    I admire your confidence but feel it's based on wishful thinking more than considering the future. For one, you can't work harder than a robot. That's one of the reasons they're so useful on assembly lines. As for your "skill set" -- well, yes, being skilled in a field robots cannot fill is a good idea. But what fields do you think those are?
  • #11
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    @PNWest We all know the standards for Nobel Prize is very high huh? Was that his reward for going along with the proven to fail Utopian ideals?
    What did Barry do again to "earn" his?
  • #12
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    @Zazziness - How about designing, engineering, and assembling robots? Robot repair, robot sales, robot maintenance and programming. Lots and lots of high skilled high paying jobs, for those who are willing to work hard to master those skills. There may come a day though that being a cashier at Walmart is a thing of the past. The highly skill though, will always be employable.
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  • #19
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    "Robots, Krugman warns, will automate more than just manufacturing jobs, it'll affect other high-skill high-labor jobs too, such as translations and legal research."

    You don't need a robot for translations and legal research, just a computer, and computers are already being used in those fields. There is no AI program that I know of that can translate as well as a human. Try depending on a translation program like Google Translate to get you through a foreign language class and see what happens. It is hard enough for human beings to understand idioms originating in other cultures to expect AI programs to do it. I'm not worried about it happening during my lifetime.
  • #33
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    Interesting. As far as I'm concerned, computers are just a robot component. And language? Hasn't Rosetta Stone replaced far more language teachers than it employs?
  • #49
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    Computer legal research is no substitute for intelligent reading of the cases. There are reported instances where lawyers with shoddy work ethics do computer research. They find and cite a case based on a quote, what the computer could not tell them was thd quote was from the dissent. They quoted the losing side in support of their argument. Computers lack a brain, and unfortunatelly people increasingly fall prey to the sane affliction.
  • #66
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    @Neo_NtheMatrix I never said that I was a liberal or a Democrat, neither do I follow the conservative or Republican party line. Every issue should be considered independently from party dogma, in my opinion. I call myself a moderate and an independent voter, but few people seem to believe it. Partisanship is damaging to reasonable problem solving.
  • #70
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    @Zazziness "Robot" was derived from the Russian word for "work". Robots integrated into industry is described as Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM). I have never used Rosetta Stone. I would imagine that it will teach you enough of a foreign language to ask for directions and order food at restaurants, but I would not rely on it to teach you the nuances of language necessary to negotiate business deals, political solutions or even everyday conversations. My Chinese language instructor told me that if I really wanted to know common Chinese then I should go to China and hang out at a fish market. Next time I saw him, I greeted him with "Hey bro! How's it hangin'?" He stared at me with nothing to say.
  • #6
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    Yup. Who makes the robots? People do. Who repairs the robots? People do.
    The only thing we have to worry about is when the robots want to become unionized. Once that happens Barry will support robots fully. Until that happens Barry will blame them for everything,(ATMs, kiosks).
  • #9
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    People design the robots. But once designed and the assembly line set up, robots are more than capable of building more robots, as instructed.
  • #17
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    @Zazziness Who does the "as instructed" part? Robots are incapable of independent thought, they only follow installed programs. It is people that make the programs.
  • #27
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    @woodtick57 Yes, but it's a pyramid. It might take 100 workers to build a robot and twelve people to design one. But since the robots replace the workers on the assembly line, we're down to twelve employed people. And not just any people. People who were gifted at birth with the right kind of intelligence to do that kind of work and who were fortunate enough to receive the training it took to develop it.
  • #58
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    Well, no, but then there weren't a lot of people involved in pulling around transportation. A lot of horses were put out of work, though.
  • #5
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    Worried about ROBOTs causing unemployment? Wasn't this concern first raised during the industrial revolution?

    Unless we import these ROBOTs from China, many jobs come from the manufacture of the ROBOT and it's component parts. How about the jobs from Selling and Servicing ROBOTs?

    In most cases, the human mind is capable of doing things the ROBOT cannot, starting with reason and invent.

    Uneducated, stupid people may find ROBOTs taking their jobs requiring them to find either higher or lower skill jobs. I don't think we'll have Landscaper or Carpenter ROBOTs as both jobs require reason and imagination.
  • #22
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    @Zazziness Those vacuum ROBOTs suck.(for the slow kids here, that is a play on words, also known as humor).

    Mowing the lawn is a good example of my argument, the ROBOT can do that part of the job, but selecting the length of the lawn relative to weather forecasts or customer desire for a specific appearance, is beyond the reasoning ability. Choosing the correct plants for an artistic flowerbed isn't a job for automation.
  • #31
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    @Sharpshooter You know for every landscape designer there are many more people who are actually execute the work. It's those actually doing the work who are going to lose their jobs, as the landscape designer merely punches the correct robot buttons to tell it how long the grass should be. It's a dilemma, it truly is and it has been since automation worked its way into assembly lines. Now that it has moved outside assembly lines because AI gets better by the day, its impact is only stronger.
  • #36
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    @Zazziness I don't entirely disagree with your definition of the problem... The issue is what one does when faced with losing your job to automation. One group will sit in the corner and suck their thumbs while they wait for the Government to step in and hand them a ready made solution.

    Others will get off their ass and FIND a way to make money with the new technology.

    ROBOTs won't drive human unemployment, people drive unemployment. Some people will NEVER be unemployed for a significant length of time because they possess the drive to invent jobs if necessary.
  • #39
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    @Sharpshooter This will be politically incorrect but it is the truth: many people are not lacking willpower, as conservatives always say. They lack intelligence. The people who will never be unemployed will be the smart ones. OK. How about those of average or below average IQ? Where do they go? What do they do? They don't know how their refridgerator works -- they are not going to go into robot repair no matter how much training you throw at them. Conservatives always talk as though everyone's brain is exactly the same when it isn't even close. Neo_Matrix blithely waves his hand and says "Sure, Walmart jobs may go away but..." But nothing. What are all those people who do very well as retail clerks but who don't have a lot of other options going to do when their job goes away? It's worrisome.
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  • #112
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    Eliminate the jobs then who buys the products? If jobs are reduced to menial labor then that robot that cost the company $3.25 an hour will have to result in much lower prices for goods produced so the masses of low wage workers can afford the products. How many Rolls and Yachts can one person have?

    Robots in Asia are human and they only cost a few cents an hour.
  • #104
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    From TechnologicalUtopia.com , with permission.

    We all want to cheer every time a robot puts someone out of work. Work should be optional given the productivity gains we are seeing and the cost of living. Our governments should be spending more of our tax-dollars on something many seem to want. I'm for robotics that are owned by all of the citizens of a country. Fully automated robotics factories, with self replicating robotic arms. Highly automated renewable energy, windmills or underwater water mills. Highly automated steel production. Highly automated chip manufacturing, and Linux. I've seen some automated building manufacturing companies starting up as well. Other prerequisite products can eventually be manufactured as well. All source code and blueprints have to be fully owned with rights to an infinite amount of use. All owned by the citizens of the country concerned. Small factories at first, with all of the bugs worked out, so that it largely builds itself in the end. It should be affordable, I'm an economic conservative. Eventually the complex can produce consumer goods besides steel, energy, chips, buildings, and robotics. Charities and the open source community can help as well. I support liberal licensing agreements of source code and blueprints, to allow royalty free replication. Surpluses could be sold to pay for additional engineering by those ambitious. Revenues would be paid to those citizens who have invested. Continued exponential self-replication would eventually lead to true post-scarcity, for every citizen of a country.
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  • #99
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    well a few questions first: will the robots be forced to join the union of automated robots? if so it may not, be cheaper in the long run. and will i be discriminated aganst, should me and a robot apply for the same job? and will i be required to join the union of automated robots, should i get the job? and will the robots, be required to pay social security, unemployment, and income tax?
  • #95
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    History has shown that advances in technology create more jobs than they abolish. The Industrial Revolution is ample evidence of that. It makes little economic sense to pay an 8th grade dropout $28.00 an hour to turn a bolt on an assembly line.
  • #94
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    This is the third time you have posed this exact same question without really offering any new reason to take it seriously. An operating definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
  • #93
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    I think if you use robots help humans their good for are future in factorys but i work in a factory and i dont think a robot coupd do my job the same way or better than i can mainly because of constant machine maintence so either way im needed
  • #92
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    If automation keeps American factories churning out goods, why would we be against it? The Chinese worker needs to worry about automation because we will soon be able to move manufacturing back to the USA.
  • #91
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    How do we know that we haven't already been replaced by robots, and that our "consciousness" is merely computer programming designed to give the illusion of free will via the law of large numbers? Take some acid and ponder that one.
  • #89
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    Lol Obama thinks so ! What a retard ! But then again if Obama and the media need a excuse for his failed economic plan then they will blame robots cats dogs trees the flux capacitor ! Because the messiah can't do wrong
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