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  • #4
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    It's more than that. Most black people in the USA are totally disenfranchised. No money, no future, gangs rule large areas in major cities. He represents everything the thug rap culture claims to represent. He took revenge on "whitey". That's the bottom line.
  • #12
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    I tend to agree with you, but there's a part of me that hates to believe that, I don't
    think racial tensions have been this bad since the 60's. It is disheartening that people
    are more divided now than they ever were...with the exception of the Civil War. It's
    almost as if everyone is turning on everyone else, and the 'political correctness' is to
    the point of so much over saturation, it is sickening.
  • #14
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    @jessejaymes Thug rap, gangs taking over cities, how is that not caused by black people themselves? Look at some of the letters written by black people during the grat migration, they had it bad and faced severe discrimination but they never blamed others. all they asked for was a chance to prove themselves, and they did just that when given a chance.
    Why is this lost on the current day black people that just blame racism if they are not successful. Louis Armstrong severe discrimination yet sang what is possibly the best song I have ever heard "What A Wonderful World".
  • #19
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    @crusader Cause and effect sir. I am not black. I am not in support of gangs. I think they're vermin. I am simply speaking to the reality. I could find you a thousand gangsters tomorrow in Los Angeles that still think tupac is alive. It is what it is. urban folklore. As this will be.
  • #22
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    @crusader Also, many people lived through the depression and waited for hours in
    bread lines or to get a bowl of soup. Today, if someone can't get the toy they want
    to get their kid for Christmas, they'll trample others to get it. It's a different time, where no one respects human life..especially in the ghetto areas, but in other places
    too. I'm not sure what happened between the day of self respect and morals, to what
    we have now. It's a crazy world...
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  • #122
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    @Denizen_Kate perhaps, but wHo says they were innocent. Two of them were cops. And the other two no more innocent then the innocent civilians killed in Iraq.
  • #128
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    @PoliticalSpice Agreed. I'm not condoning what he did. Given his mental state, he reacted the only way he could to bring his treatment from the LAPD to the forefront and therefor marking and killing those that in his sickend mind were at fault for ruining his life. He killed and was killed in return. He is no more. What I think over shadows this whole event is cause and effect. The LAPD has been accused of corruption and brutality and proven so, so many times. Rodney King for example. It's sad to think of how many innocent lives have been lost or ruined at the hands of the LAPD. Dornner made His choice to fight back and people died. That's wrong. What needs to be done is have an independent Civilian panel to investigate aligations like his and not by the same police force. The way it is now, Kind a like the coyote watching the fox that is watching the chicken house.
  • #132
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    @st-louie12 I agree. The LAPD launched their own re-evaluation in the hopes of preventing that. But the fact is that even if an independent commission is launched it makes only a small difference for awhile. I watched the problem in ny city. I've lived through four or five such commissions. The hearings, the drama, the reforms, and about ten years later all over again. Bigcity policeneed be largely eliminated. Maybe replaced by citizen neighborhood patrols with non- lethal weapons and communication devices backed by a much smaller police force. Cops should not be permitted to ride two to a vehicle, and most should be mostly on foot patrol. That would help a lot because it would make them part of the neighborhood and dependent on its people instead of a gang of thugs. It would also save a fortune.
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  • #121
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    He asked no one to feel sorry for him. He took action. Inlike the snivelling people on here who just complain and bee-atch about how they are losing what they hold dear, he stood up to LAPD till the end.
  • #125
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    It really does not. That is why no one in LAPD took action against the cop after Dorner reported he had used excessive force. That is why they hounded him from the department for not withdrawing his report.
  • #147
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    The 'moral decline of America' doesn't even exist. It's just something people say when someone does something that doesn't agree with their personal morals. I bet you anything that this guy believed what he was doing was morally right. From reporting the cop beating, to getting fired over it, to killing people over it. Not saying he's right for doing it, but morals are personal, so projecting your personals morals as 'American' morals is just that, projection. We are a nation of laws, so if you say the lawlessness of America has no limits, I'd agree, two wrongs don't make a right.
  • #18
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    "A fellow student called me a (racial epithet). My response was swift and non-lethal. I struck him fast and hard with a punch an (sic) kick." This from the "manifesto" of a man who claims that he was fired because of racism and complaints of police brutality. If he started his police career by assaulting another recruit for saying a word that he disliked, I wonder how gentle he would have been if a citizen called him a (racial epithet) while he was on the job. He is no hero of mine.
  • #28
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    At one point in my youth another guy and I applied to the LAPD and took a battery of tests. I was rejected on the grounds of immaturity. Hell I could have told them that. told to reapply in two years. Never did. The point is this. When you force affirmative action on departments you are going to have some of these kinds of people slip through the cracks because of a quota system. Doesn't mean 90% of black cops are going to be like this one but it is a result of affirmative action.
  • #57
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    @jessejaymes I can't say why assaulting another student did not get him washed out of the police academy as it should have, but if he had been walked I suspect that he would have said it was due to racism.
  • #60
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    @Dan_Tien I do not understand it either. The point of my story in applying to the LAPD back when we did was long before affirmative action and despite us being white, honorably discharged veterans and no records they rejected on ground that were highly subjective. YET they won't discharge someone in training for assaulting another student today? I have no clue what is going on there.
  • #34
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    @Catfish that's just a lazy answer. What is the evidence for that? I mean that they didn't catch any of his mental problems. They supposed to root that out so you don't get so many hot head crazies in the force.
  • #47
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    @Catfish How do you figure he wasn't qualified for the police force but qualified to be ex military? He was obviously pretty qualified to be ex military and able to not be found and be considered a threat because of him being highly trained hence why he was called "highly trained." So that kind of disproves him not being qualified to be police. He just snapped. I don't understand why people try to find excuses for these kinds of things especially race as the reason, unless you have a reason why whites are the ones responsible for the majority of mass killings and being serial killers?
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  • #92
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    We should be able to see details of his LAPD "career" before long. Rumor has it that he was a real dud...disciplined, shot himself in the hand during training, etc. The real question is, "Why did LAPD hire him in the first place?"
  • #84
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    The people who support him are probably just as crazy as he is himself. In my opinion, he is only gaining fans because of the LAPD firing on the wrong vehicle that contained 2 Hispanic women. Folk "Hero" or not, either way he is still a murderer. He killed multiple people, but people are saying "GoDornerGo" and "We stand with you Dorner". He is not somebody that I would want on the run, and I personally would not want to "Stand" with him. The end result is a man who killed 4 people evading law enforcement while a select amount of people support him and would probably ask for his autograph. Being on the run starts with lies, can lead to more killing and/or crimes and always ends with either death, incarceration, or fleeing the country. It just goes to show you how ignorant and naive some people can be.
  • #76
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    That LA PD invoked fire, has lead to more Liberal wetdream "Climate Change"
    shame on them!!
    I hope that Cabin owner is willing to sue the LA PD for their loss.....LOL
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  • #91
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    So what do you say about the white cops where there before affirmative action that were abusing other ethnicities... It's not a racial thing.... AT ALL
  • #108
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    @Chanel - It's especially sad when everything turns into a 'race' thing. My view is that as long as people continue to see color, strive to see it, then it will always be a problem. It appears that all a scenario has to have is 2 different colors and then some people 'out' themselves by bringing the race thing. Good/Bad, guilty/innocent, whatever, regardless of the actions. In fact, it seems to be prejudice driven in predetermination.
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  • #6
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    His killing spree ended with his death, so we'll never really understand why he did what he did. Theories will abound, of course, and people will project their own fears of government or race as a means of trying to understand the incomprehensible. Hell, even Glenn Beck jumped on the bandwagon today with his "radical progressives" meme. http://goo.gl/2DNva
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