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  • #4
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    I think it's an abomination that Mississippi would go against the bible and ban slavery. Here I thought one state had the common sense to follow the words of God and keep slavery legal and they go and ruin it because of some movie about that anti-christ Abraham Lincoln
  • #8
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    I constantly find myself in agreement with your post, as well a liking your humor. Was shocked to check your profile and see you are a republican!
  • #32
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    No one should be enslaved at any point.Then how is it right the government enslaves millions in todays world and its no problem?Supply , food ,shelter,medical needs and phones.When the slaves of long ago were freed many prospered on their own with out government aid.Today the government makes it a way of life.How sad.
  • #10
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    @thatgirl I went to Ole Miss and lived in the South for about 20 years. What's really frightening is the level of incompetence I see in government every day. Most of those rural people at least have enough sense to realize that if you keep spending money you don't have your little world will fall down around you.
  • #11
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    @Your_Name_Here If you want to talk about the govt, please start your own thread, dont hijack someone elses, its considered bad form.
  • #17
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    @thatgirl

    Only time I was in Mississippi was when my Dad was transferred to NAS Atlanta back in the 80's and when he finally got out and we moved back to the Great State of Texas...so, I have no real memory of being there...
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  • #37
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    Did you know that the "Common Wealth of Kentucky" --was also late in ratifying the 13th amendment. They did not ratify until 1976!---And (not that I believe for a moment that it was an "oversight" on the part of Mississippi)---But in the case of Kentucky...it certainly was not.
  • #53
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    @MaxPain @ sonny. There is the possibility that their Dixie cups simply rotted way in their bunkers and they came to the sad conclusion that the south was not going to rise again.
  • #50
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    I'm really glad that Mississippi finally did this as a matter of formality...(I say "formality" because MS had already ratified it before it became part of the US Constitution... but it needed to re-ratify it after Reconstruction)... MS has gotten a bum rap from hollywood, and from some of its bigoted citizens, past and present, but all in all, the state is full of good people and rich in culture.

    FYI: The Bill of Rights were not ratified in MA, GA and CT until 1939... The 14th Amendment was not ratified by MD and CA until 1959, and KY until 1976... Black men could not vote in OR til 1959, MD til 1973, KY til 1976, and TN til 1997... and women could not vote in FL or SC til 1969, GA and LA til 1970, and MS til 1984.
  • #31
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    And this accomplishes what? Is it a grand gesture of reconciliation? Or part of an agenda to keep proposed slave reparations in the public eye? In the unlikely event that Congress passes a bill providing the descendants of slaves with tax-generated compensation for this blight on our history, Mississippi and other slave states may decide that pay-outs are taxable income and reap a goodly portion. The IRS may take the same position.There is also the matter of states that abolished slavery prior to the Civil War such as New York and Pennsylvania. There are not many records that survive. It appears to be a pointless feel good measure.
  • #15
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    In all the years of misspent youth criss crossing America playing in bad bands I have to say the worst culture shock I ever experienced was in Mississippi, Alabama and Oklahoma. I had reason to return to Oklahoma recently and they haven't changed a bit. Even more racist than when I was younger. I say we let the bible get away with seceding this time.
  • #9
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    lincoln,cost my family a lot of money. when he freed the slaves.we lost millions of dollars.look at the price of cotton nowdays.my family took better care of our slaves than the government does now.
  • #21
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    @jessejaymes The cotton gin actually increased the use of slaves in the South. It only cleans the cotton more quickly than could be done by hand. It's invention allowed for greater productivity, but more slaves were needed to plant more cotton fields and pick the cotton to process.
  • #24
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    @jessejaymes get rid of the cotton gin,repeal the 13th amendment. problem solved. get our salves back.that solve 90% of gun violence save the government billions$ in food stamps,welfare,healthcare.if we can get our salves back ,we can put this country back on track. that will get rid of all the mexicans too.
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